Watching TV for over 3 hours may up kids' diabetes risk

London, March 14 (IANS) If your kid is spending three or more hours daily in front of TV, using computers, games consoles, tablets and smartphones, he or she may be at risk of developing diabetes, a study has showed. The findings showed that children with increased exposure to digital screens may be at risk of having high adiposity levels, which...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

High-intensity aerobic training may help reverse ageing

New York, March 11 (IANS) High-intensity aerobic exercise may be the best type of training for people over 65, as it can reverse some cellular aspects of ageing, an Indian-origin researcher has found. The findings showed that high-intensity interval training (or cardio) like running and walking, improved muscle protein content enhancing energeti...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

How to manage your smartphone notifications better

​New York, March 7 (IANS) Are you annoyed with your smartphone's relentless stream of text messages, push alerts, social media messages and other noisy notifications? Take heart, experts at Rutgers University in New Jersey, US, have developed a new model that allows the smartphones to learn automatically like a "human secretary" and predict th...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Yoga could replace antidepressants

New York, March 4 (IANS) If you are diagnosed with depression, just take a deep breath and join yoga classes to experience significant reduction in symptoms without the side effects associated with antidepressants, new research suggests. "This study supports the use of a yoga and coherent breathing intervention in major depressive disorder in pe...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Why a sitting job is bad for your heart and waist

​London, March 2 (IANS) Do you have a desk-bound job? Beware, you may be at a heightened risk of developing cardiovascular diseases by 0.2 per cent and an increase in waist circumference by two cm, for every additional hour of sitting on top of five hours, researchers warned. The findings showed that those who had desk jobs had a bigger waist ...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Lack of exercise linked to hard-to-treat heart failures

New York, Feb 28 (IANS) A sedentary lifestyle can take a huge toll on your heart. Researchers have found that lack of exercise and excessive weight are strongly associated with a type of heart failure that is very hard to treat. Heart failure is a chronic condition in which the heart is unable to supply enough oxygenated blood to meet the demand...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Why teenagers rarely share online risks with parents

​New York, Feb 28 (IANS) An increasing number of teenagers get discouraged to talk to their parents about potentially risky online experiences, such as cyberbullying, sexual exchanges and viewing inappropriate content online, because parents tend to emote much stronger feelings and tend to freak out, become angry or scared, researchers have found...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Heel-to-ground foot makes us better fighters, slow runners

​New York, Feb 24 (IANS) Standing with heels planted allows humans more swinging force when fighting, but the heel-down posture also makes us bad at fleeing, says a study. In contrast, many other species of mammals, including most primates, stand, walk and run with their heels elevated, and on the balls of their feet or toes, a posture importa...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Focus on building stamina than just weight-loss: Experts

New Delhi, Feb 24 (IANS) Rather than focussing only on weight-loss and a well-toned body, one should have a holistic approach to fitness and build stamina across all areas -- running marathons, lifting weights, cycling, and performing basic daily chores, experts say. "Fitness doesn't mean good looks, It means progressive improvement in strength,...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Chronic stress may give you a pot belly

​London, Feb 23 (IANS) People who suffer long-term stress may also be more prone to gaining extra kilos overtime, says a study. The findings, published in the journal Obesity, are based on examination of hair samples for levels of cortisol, a hormone which regulates the body's response to stress. The study showed that exposure to higher lev...
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Latest Updates

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

Main campus

Open on location Google Map